Baseball cards and marbles

sport ball baseball play
Photo by Anastasia Zhenina on Pexels.com

“Buy The Truth And Do Not Sell It”

Prov. 23:23

Warren E. Berkley

In the neighborhood of my childhood there were two commodities of exchange: marbles and baseball cards. We were also fortunate to have crawdads, sock balls and various other treasures. But when you needed to do some serious trading, you had to have either marbles or baseball cards.

Sometime after 1953, I came into possession of about four Mickey Mantle baseball cards. Now the primary purpose of having baseball cards in the 1950’s was bragging and trading. (On rare occasions, baseball cards might also be useful to bribe a bully. As a last resort, before being beaten to a pulp, you could offer the bully a popular baseball card.)

Back to these ’53 Mantle cards I owned. In a moment of immature impulse, I traded those four cards to Charles Pruitt for a bag of marbles. I don’t even have the bag of marbles today (I lost my marbles). Those four Mickey Mantle cards sell today for thousands each! If I had them today I would pay debts and buy a truck.

Nobody told me in 1953 to hold on to those cards. I didn’t appreciate the value of what I had, so I lost it.

Do you have a Bible? Have you learned the truth about Jesus Christ and what the individual response should be? Hold on to that truth, comply with it, share it. Do not sell it. You’ll be setting yourself up for eternal regret.

One thought on “Baseball cards and marbles

  1. A TALE OF TWO COACHES – 2 coaches i worked with collected baseball cards in their youth. Both were a few years older than me so would have cards of many collectible and expensive players. When they left home they left their collections maybe not fully appreciating their value.
    As time went by one of the mothers kept the collection and eventually my friend took it off her hands. He later had to put a special rider on his home insurance because of the worth of the cards. The other coach – his mama threw the cards away. You can probably still hear the echoes of his crying these many years later.

    Like

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